The Virtual Lodge Room

Take a virtual tour the Michelham Priory Lodge room and click on the Info symbols to see more information.

  

 

 The Worshipful Master is in effect the Lodge’s chairman, he presides over the Lodge

The square.

Worshipful Master

The Worshipful Master is in effect the Lodge’s chairman, he presides over the Lodge and plays the leading role in all of the ceremonies. His first duty is to formally open the Lodge at each meeting. During his progress through the previous Offices, he will have accumulated knowledge and experience of Freemasonry. This is the Office to which all Freemasons should aspire, even if they choose not to embrace some of the more esoteric principles of the Masonic journey, and should at least enjoy the camaraderie and support of their fellow Lodge members and its positive impact on their outlook to life.

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 The Senior Warden is the second of the Principal Officers in the Lodge

The Level.

Senior Warden

After serving as Junior Warden for a year, the member become eligible for promotion to Senior Warden, the second of the Principal Officers. The Senior Warden is responsible for closing the Lodge. During his year of Office, he will prepare himself for the Office of Worshipful Master.

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 The Junior Warden is the third of the Principal Officers in the Lodge

The Plumb rule.

Junior Warden

The Junior Warden is the third of the Principal Officers his duty is supervising the Brethren at refreshment. Indeed, in some Lodges, the Junior Warden supervises the Stewards.

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The retiring Worshipful Master each year automatically becomes the Immediate Past Master and has a designated seat in the Lodge to the left of his successor The square and the diagram of the 47th proposition of the 1st Book of Euclid engraven on a silver plate, pendant within it.

Immediate Past Master

The retiring Worshipful Master each year automatically becomes the Immediate Past Master and has a
designated seat in the Lodge to the left of his successor, from where he can offer him help and guidance based on his experience. He can also be called upon to deputise for the Worshipful Master in his absence.
These are the progressive Offices in the Lodge, in the sense that a member would normally progress from one to the next each year until a member becomes a Past Master. A Lodge, like any other social organisation, needs another group of Officers to manage its affairs, and is usually (but not necessarily) occupied by Past Masters of the Lodge. These Officers are also appointed each year by the Worshipful Master. It is common practice for an individual to serve in one of these Offices for a number of years, to ensure a degree of continuity within the Lodge.

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 The Chaplain’s principal role is to lead prayers at the beginning and end of the Lodge meetings, to say Grace before meals and to give thanks afterwards

A book on a triangle surmounting a glory.

Chaplain

The Chaplain’s principal role is to lead prayers at the beginning and end of the Lodge meetings, to say Grace before meals and to give thanks afterwards. Only a few Lodge Chaplains have any religious training, and all prayers said in the Lodge are non-denominational. At this point it is appropriate to stress the point that Freemasonry is not a religion, pseudo, quasi or otherwise, although it does require its members to believe in a single God. However, it leaves it to the individual as to how he interprets that belief.

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 The Treasurer's role is the same as in any other organisation, in that he is responsible for managing the financial affairs of the Lodge.

A Key.

Treasurer

The Treasurer is elected by the members of the Lodge. His role is the same as in any other organisation, in that he is responsible for managing the financial affairs of the Lodge. He collects annual subscriptions from the members, pays the Lodge’s bills and generally balances the books. Each year he presents a statement of the Lodge’s accounts to the members of the Lodge and decides whether or not to propose a rise in subscriptions to cover current and anticipated expenditure.

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 The Secretary is responsible for Lodge administration and correspondence

Two pens in saltire, tied by a ribbon.

Secretary

The Secretary is responsible for Lodge administration and correspondence, including composing and sending out the Summons for each meeting, which includes the date, time and Agenda as well the Minutes of the last meeting. He also maintains a list of all the members of the Lodge, with their Masonic ranks and Offices. During Lodge meetings, he makes notes for the Minutes, then writes them up and sends them to the Lodge members for approval at the next meeting. He advises the Worshipful Master on points of procedure and will often make recommendations to him on appointments to the Lodge Offices. He communicates with Grand Lodge and Provincial Grand Lodge on behalf of the Lodge and reads out correspondence from them to the Lodge.

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 The Director of Ceremonies duties are to ensure that the Ritual and Ceremonies are carried out correctly and that everyone is in the right place at the right time

Two rods in saltire, tied by a ribbon.

Director of Ceremonies

The Director of Ceremonies duties are to ensure that the Ritual and Ceremonies are carried out correctly and that everyone is in the right place at the right time. He is ready to prompt anyone who forgets their lines or movements. He helps the Brethren to bring out the best of themselves when performing the Ritual. He needs to be an expert in Masonic Ritual and Ceremonies.

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 He is responsible for supervising the welfare of Lodge members and their families

A scrip-purse, upon which is a heart.

Almoner

He is responsible for supervising the welfare of Lodge members and their families. He maintains contact with members who are unwell and reports on their progress to the Lodge. He also keeps a discreet eye on the widows of deceased members so that the Lodge can offer assistance should they find themselves in any particular need.

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 He is responsible for encouraging the Lodge members to give generously to charitable causes, both Masonic and non-Masonic

A Trowel.

Charity Steward

He is responsible for encouraging the Lodge members to give generously to charitable causes, both Masonic and non-Masonic. He advises them of any particular good causes that Provincial Grand Lodge is keen to support. He may organise charity fundraising social functions. Like the Treasurer, he presents an annual statement of the charity account to the Lodge, with details of the amount collected and the amount donated.

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 The purpose of a Lodge Mentor is to provide a high level of personal support to each Candidate

Two chisels in saltire.

Mentor

The purpose of a Lodge Mentor is to provide a high level of personal support to each Candidate, in order to ensure that he is able to enjoy being a Freemason, understands the principles of the Craft, and becomes involved in his Lodge and all its activities as fully as possible.

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  The Senior Deacon's main duty is to escort Fellow Craft and Master Mason Candidates around the Lodge in the Second and Third Degree ceremonies

Dove and olive branch.

Senior Deacon

After a year as a Junior Deacon, you would be eligible for appointment as Senior Deacon. Traditionally, the Senior Deacon carried messages between the Worshipful Master and the Senior Warden, but today his main duty is to escort Fellow Craft and Master Mason Candidates around the Lodge in the Second and Third Degree ceremonies. Both Deacons carry wooden wands of office, topped with a dove with an olive branch in its mouth. The same symbol is used in the Deacons’ collar jewels. This is a reference to the dove that Noah sent out from the ark and which returned with an olive branch in its mouth to signify that it had found land.

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 The Junior Deacon's main duty is to escort new Candidates around the Lodge in their initiation ceremony

Dove and olive branch.

Junior Deacon

Traditionally, the Junior Deacon carried messages between the Senior Warden and Junior Wardens, but today his main duty is to escort Entered Apprentice Candidates around the Lodge during the ceremony of Initiation.

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 The Assistant Director of Ceremonies duties are to assist the DC in the Ritual and Ceremonies and to deputise in his absence

Two rods in saltire, surmounted by a bar bearing the word ‘Assistant’.

Assistant Director of Ceremonies

He assists the Director of Ceremonies in some of the Ritual and Ceremonies and deputises for him in his absence.

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 Our Lodge organist provides music to accompany our ceremonies via computer technology

A Lyre

Organist

The prerequisite for this specialised Office is, obviously, the ability to play the organ. Masonic ceremonies are substantially enhanced by musical accompaniment; indeed the absence of music can sometimes make them appear a little incomplete. A Lodge with an experienced Organist is very fortunate. Our Lodge doesn't have an organist as such, however our organist provides music via computer technology.

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 He assists the Secretary and often collects dining fees for the dinner following the meeting. He will deputise for him in his absence

Two pens in saltire, surmounted by a bar bearing the word ‘Assistant’.

Assistant Secretary

He assists the Secretary and often collects dining fees for the dinner following the meeting. He will deputise for him in his absence.

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      The Inner Guard's duty is to prevent any unwelcome intrusion into the Lodge and to announces members or visitors who wish to enter Lodge

Two swords in saltire.

Inner Guard

After a year as a Steward, the member would usually be eligible to progress to the Office of Inner Guard. His duty is to prevent any unwelcome intrusion into the Lodge by locking the door from the inside. He also announces the names of and admits, any members or visitors who wish to enter after the Worshipful Master has formally opened the Lodge.

This is the first Office in which a member will participate in the Ritual, albeit only to a small extent, as a gentle introduction to what will follow in later Offices.

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 The Stewards ensure places are set at the Festive Board and assist the Charity Steward with the raffle

A cornucopia between the legs of a pair of compasses extended.

Steward

The first Office that a member would normally be asked to occupy is that of Steward. Traditionally, the Stewards were responsible for the preparation of the Festive Board. Some Lodges maintain the tradition of the Stewards assisting in the preparation of the Festive Board, ensuring that there are sufficient place settings, as well as serving the meal and drinks. In our Lodge the Stewards ensure places are set at the Festive Board and assist the Charity Steward with the raffle. Typically, each Lodge has between two and six Stewards.

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 The Tyler is responsible for setting up the Lodge before meetings start and he normally sits outside the door of the Lodge during meetings, to ensure that no unauthorised persons enter the Lodge

A Sword.

Tyler

The Tyler is responsible for setting up the Lodge before meetings start and he normally sits outside the door of the Lodge during meetings, to ensure that no unauthorised persons enter the Lodge. He is also responsible for preparing Candidates for the ceremony of initiation and for clearing up the Lodge after it has closed. For these services, he is sometimes paid a fee from Lodge funds. He is sometimes not a member of the Lodge, indeed many Tylers work for several Lodges. However, in some Lodges the Tyler is a Past Master and therefore is not paid.

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Lodges have pictorial boards called tracing boards and represent the degrees in Freemasonry in allegorical form

Lodge Tracing Boards

Lodges have pictorial boards called tracing boards and represent the degrees in Freemasonry in allegorical form.

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 The Lodge banner adorns almost every English Constitution Lodge

Lodge Banner

The Lodge banner adorns almost every English Constitution Lodge today became popular during the middle to second half of the 18th century, originating from a simple means of identification dating back thousands of years. This is the Michelham Priory Lodge banner

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